June 2017

 

Dr. Giles, a former intern at Reid and Associates, is now a full-time member of the veterinary staff. A Canadian from Nova Scotia and a 2014 graduate of the Atlantic Veterinary College on Prince Edward Island in Canada, Dr. Giles is focusing on equine breeding and reproductive medicine, aka “repro.”

 

Join us as we have a chat with Dr. Giles.

 

 

Q: What is the one thing people always ask you about your job?

A: The most common question is “Why repro?” Because, I like the whole reproduction process, particularly working with the stallions and processing and freezing of semen. I find the actual handling of the stallions very interesting. The key is keeping the collection process as quiet, calm and uneventful as possible, beginning with careful phantom training.

 

 

Q: How did you get interested in repro in the first place?

A: I took the basic reproduction classes in school and it came really easily to me and I enjoyed it. Then, I took all the advanced classes and all the labs I could. I did an internship in Alberta and then I took this internship at Reid and Associates with its focus on reproduction.

 

 

Q: What’s new and different in equine breeding and reproductive medicine?

A: A lot of people are getting into embryo transfers – it’s definitely a big thing. It’s a way you can continue to have a competitive mare, yet get some babies as well. This technology allows you to capture and transfer a competition mare’s genetics to a recipient mare without her having to take time off from showing AND you can get more than one baby a year.

 

 

Q: How do you find recipient mares?

A: There are farms that do a lot of embryo transfers. These farms have herds of horses - hundreds of mares - and you send the embryo there and lease the mare for a year. There’s one in Ocala, Florida, and another one in Columbia, Missouri. They have so many mares that pretty much any day you send an embryo, there are at least a couple of mares that are synced up properly.

 

Some people have their own mares they want to use but it is so much easier to use these farms. We collect a lot of embryos here and we try to get the owners to use these facilities because there’s only a small window of time that works for the mare you are getting the embryo from and the mare you are putting the embryo into. They have to be so closely synced that it takes owners a lot of time, effort and money and it’s easier and almost less expensive to collect the embryo and ship it to a professional farm.

 

 

Q: Does the recipient mare stay at the farm?

A: You can pay to keep the mare there or they will ship the mare to you and you can take care of the mare for a year and the foaling until they are weaned.

 

 

Q: Who usually chooses to use embryo transfer at Reid and Associates?

A: The clinic works with all different kinds of horses - all breeds and a variety of disciplines. Our caseload at the clinic is mostly a lot of Warmbloods because the owners want to keep the mares actively showing in high-performance dressage, hunters and jumpers.

 

 

Q: Why did you decide to stay on at Reid and Associates?

A: Because they asked me?!? No, really… because I love the people and I absolutely love Dr. Erin Newkirk. I’ve learned a lot from her. She is not only working on enhancing the reproductive services at the clinic, but she’s a surgeon, an internist and a lameness and sports medicine expert. She’s been my mentor throughout this year and there is still so much more to learn. Dr. Newkirk is brilliant when it comes to repro and the repro practice is getting so popular that I’m staying on to help her.

 

I’m really looking forward to continuing here, meeting people, working with all the doctors and especially working with Dr. Newkirk.

 

 

 

 

Meet Jacqueline Giles, DVM, the Newest Member of Our Team

 

 

Our team’s first priority is always the same.

The health and well-being of your horse.

 

Located minutes from the Winter Equestrian Festival and Global Dressage Festival showgrounds in Wellington, Florida

 

Reid and Associates Equine Clinic

1630 F Road

Loxahatchee, FL 33470

561-790-2226

 

© 2016 All Rights Reserved.

 

June 2017

 

Dr. Giles, a former intern at Reid and Associates, is now a full-time member of the veterinary staff. A Canadian from Nova Scotia and a 2014 graduate of the Atlantic Veterinary College on Prince Edward Island in Canada, Dr. Giles is focusing on equine breeding and reproductive medicine, aka “repro.”

 

Join us as we have a chat with Dr. Giles.

 

 

Q: What is the one thing people always ask you about your job?

A: The most common question is “Why repro?” Because, I like the whole reproduction process, particularly working with the stallions and processing and freezing of semen. I find the actual handling of the stallions very interesting. The key is keeping the collection process as quiet, calm and uneventful as possible, beginning with careful phantom training.

 

 

Q: How did you get interested in repro in the first place?

A: I took the basic reproduction classes in school and it came really easily to me and I enjoyed it. Then, I took all the advanced classes and all the labs I could. I did an internship in Alberta and then I took this internship at Reid and Associates with its focus on reproduction.

 

 

Q: What’s new and different in equine breeding and reproductive medicine?

A: A lot of people are getting into embryo transfers – it’s definitely a big thing. It’s a way you can continue to have a competitive mare, yet get some babies as well. This technology allows you to capture and transfer a competition mare’s genetics to a recipient mare without her having to take time off from showing AND you can get more than one baby a year.

 

 

Q: How do you find recipient mares?

A: There are farms that do a lot of embryo transfers. These farms have herds of horses - hundreds of mares - and you send the embryo there and lease the mare for a year. There’s one in Ocala, Florida, and another one in Columbia, Missouri. They have so many mares that pretty much any day you send an embryo, there are at least a couple of mares that are synced up properly.

 

Some people have their own mares they want to use but it is so much easier to use these farms. We collect a lot of embryos here and we try to get the owners to use these facilities because there’s only a small window of time that works for the mare you are getting the embryo from and the mare you are putting the embryo into. They have to be so closely synced that it takes owners a lot of time, effort and money and it’s easier and almost less expensive to collect the embryo and ship it to a professional farm.

 

 

Q: Does the recipient mare stay at the farm?

A: You can pay to keep the mare there or they will ship the mare to you and you can take care of the mare for a year and the foaling until they are weaned.

 

 

Q: Who usually chooses to use embryo transfer at Reid and Associates?

A: The clinic works with all different kinds of horses - all breeds and a variety of disciplines. Our caseload at the clinic is mostly a lot of Warmbloods because the owners want to keep the mares actively showing in high-performance dressage, hunters and jumpers.

 

 

Q: Why did you decide to stay on at Reid and Associates?

A: Because they asked me?!? No, really… because I love the people and I absolutely love Dr. Erin Newkirk. I’ve learned a lot from her. She is not only working on enhancing the reproductive services at the clinic, but she’s a surgeon, an internist and a lameness and sports medicine expert. She’s been my mentor throughout this year and there is still so much more to learn. Dr. Newkirk is brilliant when it comes to repro and the repro practice is getting so popular that I’m staying on to help her.

 

I’m really looking forward to continuing here, meeting people, working with all the doctors and especially working with Dr. Newkirk.

 

 

 

 

June 2017

 

Dr. Giles, a former intern at Reid and Associates, is now a full-time member of the veterinary staff. A Canadian from Nova Scotia and a 2014 graduate of the Atlantic Veterinary College on Prince Edward Island in Canada, Dr. Giles is focusing on equine breeding and reproductive medicine, aka “repro.”

 

Join us as we have a chat with Dr. Giles.

 

 

Q: What is the one thing people always ask you about your job?

A: The most common question is “Why repro?” Because, I like the whole reproduction process, particularly working with the stallions and processing and freezing of semen. I find the actual handling of the stallions very interesting. The key is keeping the collection process as quiet, calm and uneventful as possible, beginning with careful phantom training.

 

 

Q: How did you get interested in repro in the first place?

A: I took the basic reproduction classes in school and it came really easily to me and I enjoyed it. Then, I took all the advanced classes and all the labs I could. I did an internship in Alberta and then I took this internship at Reid and Associates with its focus on reproduction.

 

 

Q: What’s new and different in equine breeding and reproductive medicine?

A: A lot of people are getting into embryo transfers – it’s definitely a big thing. It’s a way you can continue to have a competitive mare, yet get some babies as well. This technology allows you to capture and transfer a competition mare’s genetics to a recipient mare without her having to take time off from showing AND you can get more than one baby a year.

 

 

Q: How do you find recipient mares?

A: There are farms that do a lot of embryo transfers. These farms have herds of horses - hundreds of mares - and you send the embryo there and lease the mare for a year. There’s one in Ocala, Florida, and another one in Columbia, Missouri. They have so many mares that pretty much any day you send an embryo, there are at least a couple of mares that are synced up properly.

 

Some people have their own mares they want to use but it is so much easier to use these farms. We collect a lot of embryos here and we try to get the owners to use these facilities because there’s only a small window of time that works for the mare you are getting the embryo from and the mare you are putting the embryo into. They have to be so closely synced that it takes owners a lot of time, effort and money and it’s easier and almost less expensive to collect the embryo and ship it to a professional farm.

 

 

Q: Does the recipient mare stay at the farm?

A: You can pay to keep the mare there or they will ship the mare to you and you can take care of the mare for a year and the foaling until they are weaned.

 

 

Q: Who usually chooses to use embryo transfer at Reid and Associates?

A: The clinic works with all different kinds of horses - all breeds and a variety of disciplines. Our caseload at the clinic is mostly a lot of Warmbloods because the owners want to keep the mares actively showing in high-performance dressage, hunters and jumpers.

 

 

Q: Why did you decide to stay on at Reid and Associates?

A: Because they asked me?!? No, really… because I love the people and I absolutely love Dr. Erin Newkirk. I’ve learned a lot from her. She is not only working on enhancing the reproductive services at the clinic, but she’s a surgeon, an internist and a lameness and sports medicine expert. She’s been my mentor throughout this year and there is still so much more to learn. Dr. Newkirk is brilliant when it comes to repro and the repro practice is getting so popular that I’m staying on to help her.

 

I’m really looking forward to continuing here, meeting people, working with all the doctors and especially working with Dr. Newkirk.