September 2017

 

The newest associate at Reid and Associates Equine Clinic, Dr. Issey Chew-Chin, loves the team spirit at the Loxahatchee equine hospital. After vet school, she decided to come to the clinic as an intern when the chief of surgery at the New Bolton Center Hospital at the University of Pennsylvania spoke so highly of Dr. Reid and thought it would be a good fit for her internship. She meshed with the staff so well that she was offered an associate position after she completed her time as an intern.

 

“My favorite thing about working here as a new associate is the mentorship,” she said. “All the clinicians are great mentors and very supportive.”

 

She said the pervasive team mentality and doing whatever it takes to help the patient is foremost at Reid and Associates.

 

“In the middle of ‘season,’ when everyone is exhausted, a horse needed surgery for a laceration that compromised important soft tissue structures,” she said. “The surgery went well, and the horse made it to the recovery stall. However, after almost two hours in recovery, it appeared that the horse was struggling to get up. We got the sling out, and everyone took a part of the sling to get it on the horse in the smoothest, quickest way possible. However, he was resisting the sling, launching himself into the air and refusing to stand with all four limbs on the ground at the same time. Feed had even been offered as a stimulus for him to get up. Nothing we did seemed to help, so we again went into the recovery stall to remove the sling. After another hour of battling with this horse in recovery, we finally removed all forms of restraint, including the head rope, to allow him to recover on his own. Within minutes, he popped up on his feet. Sometimes the horse just wants to do it his way.”

 

Dr. Chew-Chin loves how each horse exhibits a distinct and unique personality. She began riding as a young girl in Massachusetts and realized a career as a veterinarian was in her future when she took a high school human anatomy class and found she had an interest in medicine.

 

“I put two and two together,” she said. “I knew I wanted to work with horses and I liked science and ended up with veterinary medicine.”

 

She attended the University of Delaware for her undergraduate studies as an Animal Science and Pre-Vet major and then headed to the University of Pennsylvania for vet school.

 

She developed an interest in internal medicine during her internship but is happy working in general medicine at Reid and Associates.

 

“I’ve not made any decision if I am going to specialize but I appreciate being able to work with the specialists here,” she said. “One of the reasons I stayed on here is because it’s very evidence-based oriented. They have an interest in continuing to learn. Even though they are considered experts in their area they still have a desire to learn more. That’s really important to me, too.”

Reid and Associates Welcomes Dr. Issey Chew-Chin to their Veterinary Staff

 

Our team’s first priority is always the same.

The health and well-being of your horse.

 

Located minutes from the Winter Equestrian Festival and Global Dressage Festival showgrounds in Wellington, Florida

 

Reid and Associates Equine Clinic

1630 F Road

Loxahatchee, FL 33470

561-790-2226

 

© 2016 All Rights Reserved.

 

September 2017

 

The newest associate at Reid and Associates Equine Clinic, Dr. Issey Chew-Chin, loves the team spirit at the Loxahatchee equine hospital. After vet school, she decided to come to the clinic as an intern when the chief of surgery at the New Bolton Center Hospital at the University of Pennsylvania spoke so highly of Dr. Reid and thought it would be a good fit for her internship. She meshed with the staff so well that she was offered an associate position after she completed her time as an intern.

 

“My favorite thing about working here as a new associate is the mentorship,” she said. “All the clinicians are great mentors and very supportive.”

 

She said the pervasive team mentality and doing whatever it takes to help the patient is foremost at Reid and Associates.

 

“In the middle of ‘season,’ when everyone is exhausted, a horse needed surgery for a laceration that compromised important soft tissue structures,” she said. “The surgery went well, and the horse made it to the recovery stall. However, after almost two hours in recovery, it appeared that the horse was struggling to get up. We got the sling out, and everyone took a part of the sling to get it on the horse in the smoothest, quickest way possible. However, he was resisting the sling, launching himself into the air and refusing to stand with all four limbs on the ground at the same time. Feed had even been offered as a stimulus for him to get up. Nothing we did seemed to help, so we again went into the recovery stall to remove the sling. After another hour of battling with this horse in recovery, we finally removed all forms of restraint, including the head rope, to allow him to recover on his own. Within minutes, he popped up on his feet. Sometimes the horse just wants to do it his way.”

 

Dr. Chew-Chin loves how each horse exhibits a distinct and unique personality. She began riding as a young girl in Massachusetts and realized a career as a veterinarian was in her future when she took a high school human anatomy class and found she had an interest in medicine.

 

“I put two and two together,” she said. “I knew I wanted to work with horses and I liked science and ended up with veterinary medicine.”

 

She attended the University of Delaware for her undergraduate studies as an Animal Science and Pre-Vet major and then headed to the University of Pennsylvania for vet school.

 

She developed an interest in internal medicine during her internship but is happy working in general medicine at Reid and Associates.

 

“I’ve not made any decision if I am going to specialize but I appreciate being able to work with the specialists here,” she said. “One of the reasons I stayed on here is because it’s very evidence-based oriented. They have an interest in continuing to learn. Even though they are considered experts in their area they still have a desire to learn more. That’s really important to me, too.”

 

September 2017

 

The newest associate at Reid and Associates Equine Clinic, Dr. Issey Chew-Chin, loves the team spirit at the Loxahatchee equine hospital. After vet school, she decided to come to the clinic as an intern when the chief of surgery at the New Bolton Center Hospital at the University of Pennsylvania spoke so highly of Dr. Reid and thought it would be a good fit for her internship. She meshed with the staff so well that she was offered an associate position after she completed her time as an intern.

 

“My favorite thing about working here as a new associate is the mentorship,” she said. “All the clinicians are great mentors and very supportive.”

 

She said the pervasive team mentality and doing whatever it takes to help the patient is foremost at Reid and Associates.

 

“In the middle of ‘season,’ when everyone is exhausted, a horse needed surgery for a laceration that compromised important soft tissue structures,” she said. “The surgery went well, and the horse made it to the recovery stall. However, after almost two hours in recovery, it appeared that the horse was struggling to get up. We got the sling out, and everyone took a part of the sling to get it on the horse in the smoothest, quickest way possible. However, he was resisting the sling, launching himself into the air and refusing to stand with all four limbs on the ground at the same time. Feed had even been offered as a stimulus for him to get up. Nothing we did seemed to help, so we again went into the recovery stall to remove the sling. After another hour of battling with this horse in recovery, we finally removed all forms of restraint, including the head rope, to allow him to recover on his own. Within minutes, he popped up on his feet. Sometimes the horse just wants to do it his way.”

 

Dr. Chew-Chin loves how each horse exhibits a distinct and unique personality. She began riding as a young girl in Massachusetts and realized a career as a veterinarian was in her future when she took a high school human anatomy class and found she had an interest in medicine.

 

“I put two and two together,” she said. “I knew I wanted to work with horses and I liked science and ended up with veterinary medicine.”

 

She attended the University of Delaware for her undergraduate studies as an Animal Science and Pre-Vet major and then headed to the University of Pennsylvania for vet school.

 

She developed an interest in internal medicine during her internship but is happy working in general medicine at Reid and Associates.

 

“I’ve not made any decision if I am going to specialize but I appreciate being able to work with the specialists here,” she said. “One of the reasons I stayed on here is because it’s very evidence-based oriented. They have an interest in continuing to learn. Even though they are considered experts in their area they still have a desire to learn more. That’s really important to me, too.”